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Friday October 23, 2020 Salt Lake City, UT

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Highway Safety

Inside DPS

Protecting Utah

Traffic Incident Response Week

Sunday November 10, 2019

During the week of November 10-16, the goal is to increase awareness of the dangers emergency responders face and remind drivers to slow down and move over.

Move Over for emergency vehicles - it's the law

Emergency responders across the country work tirelessly to help save lives at the scene of traffic incidents.

Every year hundreds of emergency responders experience close calls, or are struck and either injured or killed while responding to these incidents, and at incident scenes.

And motorists are as likely or more likely to be in danger at these scenes. 

November 10-16, 2019, has been designated by the Federal Highway Administration as National Traffic Incident Response Awareness Week to draw public awareness to the dangers emergency responders face when reacting to a traffic incident.

At the same time, it is important that drivers understand they are also at risk or injury or death in and around these scenes.

The response of a driver is just as important as the response of the person towing a vehicle, rescuing the trapped, healing the injured and investigating the incident.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP?

Drivers:

  • Slow down and move over when approaching and passing an incident scene to provide a protective buffer for you, for responders, and the motorists behind you.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • One in seven firefighters and police officers who die in the line of duty are killed in vehicle-related incidents.
  • Traffic incidents are the number one cause of death of EMS/EMT responders. 
  • Traffic incidents are a leading cause of death for police officers.
  • You can get a ticket if you do not slow down and move over.

If you can steer it, clear it. Many drivers think they should not move their car if they are involved in a fender-bender or crash. Even if their vehicle is drivable and there are no injuries, they believe they should wait until the police arrive and can make an accident report before moving their cars. But this is not true and actually puts them, their vehicles, and other people’s lives at risk.

Utah’s Law

Utah’s Move Over Law is contained in Utah Code 41-6a-904

Drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles, highway maintenance vehicles or towing vehicles displaying flashing red, red & white, red and blue lights or amber lights need to slow down, provide as much space as practical to the stationary vehicles, and, move over a lane if it’s safe and clear.

This law requires drivers to move over and/or slow down when approaching stopped emergency or maintenance vehicles.

The consequences of breaking this simple law can be disastrous and deadly.

It’s a life-saving law, but most people don’t know about it.

Although all 50 states have enacted “Move Over” laws, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) found that 71% of Americans are unaware of these laws.

Photos From Previous Crashes

A UHP trooper's vehicle received significant damage when a car crashed into it on the road shoulder. A UHP trooper's vehicle received significant damage when a car crashed into it on the road shoulder. A UHP trooper's vehicle received significant damage when a car crashed into it on the road shoulder.

A UHP trooper's vehicle received significant damage when a car crashed into it on the road shoulder.

Message From Governor Herbert

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